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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

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not prove our friendsl! Is it possible ? I have always talked of their cordiality, because I was convinced they could have no shadow of interest in their professions:— of that, indeed, I am convinced still—but how could they fancy they had ? There is the wonder ! If they wanted common honesty, they seem to have wanted common sense more. What hope of connection could there ever be between the English ministry and the Florentine nobility? The latter have no views of being, or knowledge for being envoys, &c. They are too poor and proud to think of trading with us; too abject to hope for the restoration of their liberty from us—and, indeed, however we may affection our own, we have showed no regard for their liberty—they have had no reason ever to expect that from us! In short, to me it is mystery ! But how could you not tell me some par-ticulars ? Have I so little interested myself with Florence, that you should think I can be satisfied without knowing the least particulars ? I must know names. Who are these wretches that I am to scratch out of my list ? I shall give them a black blot the moment I know who have behaved ill to you. Is Casa Ferroni of the number? I suspect it:—that was of your first attachments. Are the Prince and Princess dirty ?—the Suares ?—tell me, tell me! Indeed, my dear Mr. Chute, I am not of your opinion, that he should shut himself up and despise them; let him go abroad and despise them. Must he mope because the Florentines are like the rest of the world ? But that is not true, for the world in England have not declared themselves so suddenly. It has not been the fashion to desert the Earl and his friends: he has had more concourse, more professions, and has still, than in the height of his power. So
LBTTZR 76.—*• According to Lord     resignation of Sir Robert Walpole,
Dover, Mann noticed a change in tlie     with whom they supposed him to be
bearing of some of his Florentine     intimately connected, friends towards himself after the